custom

Using fullPage.js to make a vertical split-screen parallax

fullPage.js, as its author states, is a jQuery plugin which allows you to “create full screen pages fast and simple”.

How about using it to make a split-screen parallax fast and simple ?

First the required HTML structure:

<div id="splitscreen">
  <div class="section">
    <div class="column column-left">Left Side</div>
    <div class="column column-right">Right Side</div>
  </div>
</div>

Then init the fullPage.js, and customize the settings to your taste.

$(document).ready(function() {
 $('#splitscreen').fullpage({
   navigation: false,
   scrollingSpeed: 1000,
 });
});

Now the CSS for the split-screen:

#splitscreen > .section .column-left {
  float: left;
  width: 50%;
  color: #000;
  background: #fff;
}

#splitscreen > .section .column-right {
  float: right;
  width: 50%;
  color: #fff;
  background: #000;
}

#splitscreen > .section .column-left {
  transition: all 1s ease 0s;
  transform: translateY(100%);
  backface-visibility: hidden;
}

#splitscreen > .section .column-right {
  transition: all 1s ease 0s;
  transform: translateY(-100%);
  backface-visibility: hidden;
}

#splitscreen > .section.active {
  z-index: 1;
}

#splitscreen > .section.active .column-left {
  transform: translateY(0);
}

#splitscreen > .section.active .column-right {
  transform: translateY(0);
}

#splitscreen > .section.active ~ .section .column-left {
  transform: translateY(-100%);
}

#splitscreen > .section.active ~ .section .column-right {
  transform: translateY(100%);
}

/* prevent fullpage from translating the page */
#splitscreen {
  transform: translate3d(0px, 0px, 0px) !important;
}

#splitscreen > .section {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
}

Split screen parallax demo.

Drupal 8 custom throbber

Replace the default ajax progress with a fullscreen overlay CSS spinner.

.ajax-progress,
.ajax-progress-throbber,
.ajax-progress-fullscreen {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  -webkit-border-radius: 0;
  border-radius: 0;
  opacity: 1;
  background: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.8);
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  z-index: 999999;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-indent: -99999em;
}

.ajax-progress-throbber:before,
.ajax-progress-fullscreen:before {
  content: " ";
  display: block;
  width: 120px;
  height: 120px;
  -webkit-animation: spin 0.8s infinite linear;
  animation: spin 0.8s infinite linear;
  border-radius: 120px;
  border-width: 10px;
  border-style: solid;
  border-color: #D6232F transparent #D6232F transparent;
  overflow: hidden;
  text-indent: -99999em;
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
}

@-webkit-keyframes spin {
  to {
    transform: rotate(360deg); 
  }
}

@keyframes spin {
  to {
    transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}

See demo

Custom select input

Using some jQuery and CSS you can make a cross-browser custom select (dropdown) box.

<div class="select-wrapper">
    <select>
        <option selected="selected" value="1">Option 1</option>
        <option value="2">Option 2</option>
        <option value="3">Option 3</option>
        <option value="4">Option 4</option>
        <option value="5">Option 5</option>
    </select>
</div>
.select-wrapper {
  position: relative;
  width: 215px;
  height: 30px;
  padding: 0 25px 0 0;
  margin: 0;
  border: 1px solid #0D5995;
  overflow: hidden;
  background: url(select-arrow.png) no-repeat right center transparent;
}

select {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  opacity : 0;
  width: 240px;
  height: 30px;
  padding: 5px 0;
  border: none;
  background: transparent !important;
  -webkit-appearance: none;
}

.select-wrapper span {
  display: block;
  width: 210px;
  height: 30px;
  line-height: 30px;
  padding: 0 0 0 5px;
}
$(document).ready(function() {
  $('select').after('<span>' + $('option:selected', this).text() + '</span>');
  
  $('select').click(function(event) {
    $(this).siblings('span').remove();
    $(this).after('<span>' + $('option:selected', this).text() + '</span>');
  });
})

See the demo.

jQuery Cycle with carousel thumbs pager

A nice cycle gallery with thumbnail pictures navigation ( like here http://jquery.malsup.com/cycle/pager3.html ), but to use less space, make the thumbnails pager a carousel. ( see a demo here … note, that this is just to prove the concept, not much attention was given to styles ).

If you have “Prev / Next” controls on the cycle slideshow, then you will stumble upon an annoying situation: When you cycle through the slides with the cycle controls, and reach the last visible thumbnail in carousel, you will have to use the carousel controls to go to the current slide’s thumb; to avoid this i used the cycle’s ‘onPrevNextEvent’ callback to navigate through the carousel in the same time you cycle through the slides.

You will need:

1. jQuery

2. Cycle plugin

3. any jquery carousel you want ( i have used jCarousel lite )

Make the markup as you want, and adapt the jQuery code to it.

$('#slideshow').cycle({
    fx: 'scrollHorz',
    speed: 'fast',
    timeout: 0,
    prev: '#prev',
    next: '#next',
    nowrap: 1,
    pager: '#slide-pager ul',
    pagerAnchorBuilder: function(idx, slide) {
        // return selector string for existing anchor
        return '#slide-pager ul li:eq(' + idx + ') a';
    },
    onPrevNextEvent: function(dir, id, el) {
        if (dir === true) {
		if (id >= 3) { //replace '3' with your number of visible elements
			$('#slide-pager_next').click();
		}
        }
        else {
		if (id >= 1) {
			$('#slide-pager_prev').click();
		}
        }
    }
});

$("#slide-pager").jCarouselLite({
    btnNext: "#slide-pager_next",
    btnPrev: "#slide-pager_prev",
    circular: false,
    visible: 3
});

See the demo here.

WordPress registration form in a regular page

Note: This code is old, and it may not work with the latest versions of WordPress

WordPress provides a function to echo in front end a simple login form (  wp_login_form( $args ) ), but it doesn’t provide a simple way to embed the registration form ( the form displayed in /wp-login.php?action=register ) in a regular page or sidebar.

After some google-ing and trying a few plugins, i decided it is more flexible if i make one myself. In my research to do this I stumble upon this article here which is the base of what i will explain below.

Make your own WordPress registration form:

Step 1

Create a file called ‘registration_form.php’ in your theme in which paste the code below.

<div class="registration-form-wrapper">
<?php
/* the captcha result is stored in session */
session_start();

if( isset( $_POST['svalue'] ) ) {
	if($_POST['svalue'] != $_SESSION['answer']) {
		$matherror = "Wrong math!";
	}
	else {
		$matherror = " ";
	}
}

include('arithmetic_captcha.php');

if(defined('REGISTRATION_ERROR')){
    foreach(unserialize(REGISTRATION_ERROR) as $error){
	echo '<p class="error">'.$error.'</p';
    }
} elseif(defined('REGISTERED_A_USER')){
	echo '<p class="success">Successful registration, an email has been sent to '.REGISTERED_A_USER .'</p>';
}
echo '<p class="error">'. $matherror .'</p>';
?>

  <form id="my-registration-form" method="post" action="<?php echo add_query_arg('do', 'register', get_permalink( $post->ID )); ?>">
    <ul>
	<li>
	    <label for="username">Username</label>
	    <input type="text" id="username" name="user" value=""/>
	</li>
	<li>
	    <label for="email">E-mail</label>
	    <input type="text" id="email" name="email" value="" />
	</li>
	<li>
	    What is the result <strong><?php echo $math;?></strong> ? &nbsp; <input type="text" name="svalue" value="" size="7" />
	</li>
	<li>
	    <input type="submit" value="Register" />
	</li>
    </ul>
  </form>
</div>

This is basically the HTML of the form.

Step 2

Add the ‘register user’ function, which you will find below, to your theme’s ‘functions.php‘ file, ..this will register the user and validate the form.

add_action('template_redirect', 'register_a_user');
function register_a_user(){

  if(isset($_GET['do']) && $_GET['do'] == 'register'):
    $errors = array();
    if(empty($_POST['user']) || empty($_POST['email'])) $errors[] = 'Please enter a user name and e-mail.';

    $user_login = esc_attr($_POST['user']);
    $user_email = esc_attr($_POST['email']);

    $sanitized_user_login = sanitize_user($user_login);
    $user_email = apply_filters('user_registration_email', $user_email);

    if(!is_email($user_email)) $errors[] = 'Invalid e-mail.';
    elseif(email_exists($user_email)) $errors[] = 'This email is already registered.';

    if(empty($sanitized_user_login) || !validate_username($user_login)) $errors[] = 'Invalid user name.';
    elseif(username_exists($sanitized_user_login)) $errors[] = 'User name already exists.';

    if(empty($errors)):
      $user_pass = wp_generate_password();
      $user_id = wp_create_user($sanitized_user_login, $user_pass, $user_email);

      if(!$user_id):
        $errors[] = 'Registration failed';
      else:
        update_user_option($user_id, 'default_password_nag', true, true);
        wp_new_user_notification($user_id, $user_pass);
      endif;
    endif;

    if(!empty($errors)) define('REGISTRATION_ERROR', serialize($errors));
    else define('REGISTERED_A_USER', $user_email);
  endif;
}

Step 3

Create a file called ‘arithmetic_captcha.php‘ which will contain a simple random numbers generator, for a simple ‘math captcha’ to keep the spam away. This simple captcha can be used with other forms as well, …just use the code below and the check made at Step 1.

<?php
session_start();

$nr1 = mt_rand(1,10); //mt_rand($min, $max)
$nr2 = mt_rand(1,10);
if( $nr1 > $nr2 ) {
	$math = "$nr1 - $nr2";
	$_SESSION['answer'] = $nr1 - $nr2;
} else {
	$math = "$nr1 + $nr2";
	$_SESSION['answer'] = $nr1 + $nr2;
}

Step 4

Just include the ‘registration_form.php’ file created at Step 1 in your page template or wherever you want the form to appear.

<?php include('registration_form.php');?>

Or you can just download the files here (wp_registration_form.zip) and include them in your theme.

jQuery title tooltip

If you need a simple way to replace the anchor’s ( <a href=”” ></a> ), title=”” attribute with a nice customizable tooltip, below is the code and a demo.

The script adds a html <div> at the end of the <body> tag, and as you hover the specified elements it get’s the title attribute and include it in the <div id=”tooltip”>, the last part of the script is what makes the tooltip move along with mouse cursor.

The nice part is that you can make your tooltip look however you want with CSS.


<ul id="links">
 <li>
   <a href="#" title="This is one">One</a>
 </li>
 <li>
   <a href="#" title="This is two">Two</a>
 </li>
 <li>
   <a href="#" title="This is three">Three</a>
 </li>
 <li>
   <a href="#" title="This is four">Four</a>
 </li>
 <li>
   <a href="#" title="This is five">Five</a>
 </li>
</ul>


#tooltip {
 padding: 10px 15px;
 position: absolute;
 font-size: 14px;
 color: #4E4E4E;
 background: #C4E424;
 z-index: 10;
}


(function($){
	$('body').append('<div id="tooltip"></div>');
	$('#tooltip').hide();
	var $tooltip = $('#tooltip');
    $('ul#links a').each(function(){
        var $this = $(this),
			$title = this.title;
			
        $this.hover(function(){
			this.title = '';
			$tooltip.text($title).show();
        }, function(){
			this.title = $title;
			$tooltip.text('').hide();
        });
		
		$this.mousemove(function(e){
			$tooltip.css({
				top: e.pageY - 10,
				left: e.pageX + 20
			});
		});
    });
})(jQuery);

Here is a demo